Upcoming Events

A Lou Harrison Centenary Celebration | April 24, 2017

“One of the nation’s most innovative music groups.”

–PHILIP KENNICOTT, THE WASHINGTON POST

CELEBRATING THE LOU HARRISON CENTENARY

Lou Harrison (1917-2003) was a supreme practitioner of world music before there was a name for it.
His masterly synthesis of Indonesian and Western traditions produced music that is fragrant, hypnotic, and original.
On April 24, PostClassical Ensemble celebrates the Harrison Centenary at the picturesque Indonesian Embassy with a program sublimely combining a Javanese gamelan with Western instruments.
Please consider supporting PCE with a donation of $750 or more — and receive a concert ticket, an invitation to a pre-concert reception, a copy of our new Lou Harrison CD (Naxos), and a private dinner with Indonesian Ambassador Budi Bowoleksono at his residence in Cleveland Park on May 17.  
 
CELEBRATING LOU HARRISON
 
April 24, 2017, at 8 pm
The Indonesian Embassy
2020 Massachusetts Avenue NW
 
Netanel Draiblate, violin
Benjamin Capps, cello
Jacqueline Pollauf, harp
The Indonesian Embassy Javanese Gamelan
Members of PostClassical Ensemble conducted by Angel Gil-Ordonez
Commentary by gamelan master Sumarsam 
 
Harrison: Gamelan works
Harrison: Suite for Cello and Harp
Harrison: Double Concerto for Violin, Cello and Gamelan


Finale of Lou Harrison’s Violin Concerto with Tim Fain and PostClassical Ensemble conducted by Angel Gil-Ordonez March 2016 at the Indonesian Embassy

PCE Gala Spring 2017: Music for Mutual Understanding

TICKETS ON SALE NOW

We invite you to help us kick-off our multi-year Russian Festival with PostClassical Ensemble’s Gala Dinner & Performance: Music for Mutual Understanding an evening dedicated the legacy of Ambassador Arthur Hartman.

Arthur Hartman (1927-2015) was an American career diplomat who served as Ambassador to France under President Jimmy Carter and Ambassador to the Soviet Union under President Ronald Reagan.

Hartman was a master practitioner of cultural diplomacy in a period when the US State Department had largely abandoned culture as a diplomatic tool. Behind the scenes, Hartman played a key role… (read more)

Since its inception, PCE has advocated music as means of promoting mutual understanding. This season we embark on a Russian Festival featuring major Russian-born artists and scholars. We begin this spring with Music Under Stalin: The Shostakovich-Weinberg Connection. We continue next fall with The Russian Experiment. Each of our programs of music, film, theater, and commentary will explore the many compelling elements of 20th century Russian culture virtually unknown in the West.

To support our efforts to further Music for Mutual Understanding, PCE is presenting a Gala Dinner featuring Vladimir Feltsman to honor the late Ambassador Arthur Hartman. During this Gala event, we will explore how Amb. Hartman, as US Ambassador in Moscow, practiced cultural diplomacy that warmed relations between the US and Soviet Russia, as well as positively affected the lives of Russian artists, musicians and intellectuals.

For more information about table sponsorship, PCE’s multi-year Russian festival or our 2017 GALA with Vladimir Feltsman, please contact Matthew Gardner: 412.680.9228 or matthew@postclassical.com

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To support our efforts to further Music for Mutual Understanding, we seek donors interested in promoting this ideal.  

For Individual Sponsors:

A Lead Sponsor at the $20,000 level, who will be the major festival sponsor and receive recognition as such in all Festival documentation for this season and beyond; a table for ten (10) at the exclusive Music for Mutual Understanding gala on March 15 at Katzen Arts Center; Recognition from the stage and in print; Priority seating at Vladimir Feltsman’s performance and an invitation for ten (10) to an intimate private Prokofiev recital by the celebrated pianist Alexander Toradze on March 10, hosted by PCE Board of Directors Chair, Chris Denby.  Our lead sponsor will also receive ten (10) tickets to the culmination of this year’s immersion experience, The Shostakovich-Weinberg Connection, on March 25 at Sidney Harman Hall. 

Diamond sponsors at the $10,000 level, who will receive a table for ten (10) at the exclusive Music for Mutual Understanding gala on March 15 at Katzen Arts Center; Recognition in print at the event; Priority seating at Vladimir Feltsman’s performance and an invitation for ten (10) to an intimate private Prokofiev recital by the celebrated pianist Alexander Toradze on March 10, hosted by PCE Board of Directors Chair, Chris Denby; Priority seating at Vladimir Feltsman’s performance.

Gold sponsors at the $5,000 level, who will receive a table for ten (10) at the exclusive Music for Mutual Understanding gala on March 15 at Katzen Arts Center; Priority seating at Vladimir Feltsman’s performance and recognition in print.

Silver sponsors at the $2,500 level, who will receive a table for six (6) at the exclusive Music for Mutual Understanding gala on March 15 at Katzen Arts Center; Priority seating at Vladimir Feltsman’s performance and recognition in print.

Gala Single Tickets at $150, who will receive Gala dinner seating for one (1); Reserved seating at Vladimir Feltsman‘s performance. 

For Corporate Sponsorship, click here or contact Matthew Gardner: 412.680.9228 or matthew@postclassical.com


 VLADIMIR FELTSMAN – BIOGRAPHY

Pianist and conductor Vladimir Feltsman is one of the most versatile and constantly interesting musicians of our time. His vast repertoire encompasses music from the Baroque to 21st-century composers. He has appeared with all the major American orchestras and on the most prestigious musical stages and festivals worldwide.

In summer 2012, Mr. Feltsman continued his long association with the Ravinia Festival, where he performed Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No. 1 with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and James Conlon; and with the Aspen Music Festival, performing Beethoven’s “Emperor” Concerto with Jane Glover. He also appeared at the Eastern Music Festival in Greensboro, North Carolina, performing Beethoven’s 3rd Concerto with Gerard Schwarz. He performed with the Orquesta Filharmónica of the Teatro Colón in Buenos Aires in October of 2011 and returns to South America in March 2013 as featured soloist with the Orquesta de Sinfônica de Minas Gerais in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Other orchestral engagements in the upcoming 2012-13 season include performances of two Mozart concerti with the Seattle Symphony and Gerard Schwarz, and performances with the Atlantic Classical Orchestra and Music of the Baroque.

In June 2012, Mr. Feltsman returned to his native Russia to work as a conductor with the “Moscow Virtuosi” and performed with the St. Petersburg Philharmonic and Yuri Temirkanov. He returns to Moscow in 2012-13 to perform Brahms’ Piano Concerto No. 2 with Mikhail Pletnev; and to St. Petersburg, where he will conduct the St. Petersburg Philharmonic as well as perform in recital.

In great demand as a recitalist, Mr. Feltsman returned to Carnegie’s Stern Hall in March 2011, and included within the 2010-11 season recitals in Los Angeles, Kansas City, Palm Beach, Fort Worth, Lincoln, and Ann Arbor. He followed that hugely successful season of recitals with those in Philadelphia, Indianapolis, Richmond, Portland and Bogota, and will perform in recital in the 2012-13 season in New York, Miami, Palm Beach, and at Union College. South Korea welcomes Mr. Feltsman in January 2013 for both recital and chamber music performances.

Mr. Feltsman expressed his lifelong devotion to the music of J.S. Bach in a cycle of concerts which presented the major clavier works of the composer and spanned four consecutive seasons (1992-1996) at the 92nd Street Y in New York. His more recent project, Masterpieces of the Russian Underground, unfolded a panorama of Russian contemporary music through an unprecedented survey of piano and chamber works by fourteen different composers from Shostakovich to the present day and was presented by the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center in January 2003 with great success. Mr. Feltsman served as Artistic Director for this project as well as performing in most of the pieces presented during the three concert cycle. The programs included a number of world and North American premieres and were also presented in Portland, Oregon and in Tucson, Arizona at the University of Arizona. In the fall of 2006, Mr. Feltsman performed all of the Mozart Piano Sonatas in New York at the Mannes School of Music and NYU’s Tisch Center presented by New School on a specially built replica of the Walter fortepiano.

Born in Moscow in 1952, Mr. Feltsman debuted with the Moscow Philharmonic at age 11. In 1969, he entered the Moscow Tchaikovsky State Conservatory of Music to study piano under the guidance of Professor Jacob Flier. He also studied conducting at both the Moscow and Leningrad (now St. Petersburg) Conservatories. In 1971, Mr. Feltsman won the Grand Prix at the Marguerite Long International Piano Competition in Paris; extensive touring throughout the former Soviet Union, Europe and Japan followed this.

In 1979, because of his growing discontent with the restrictions on artistic freedom under the Soviet regime, Mr. Feltsman signaled his intention to emigrate by applying for an exit visa. In response, he was immediately banned from performing in public and his recordings were suppressed. After eight years of virtual artistic exile, he was finally granted permission to leave the Soviet Union. Upon his arrival in the United States in 1987, Mr. Feltsman was warmly greeted at the White House, where he performed his first recital in North America. That same year, his debut at Carnegie Hall established him as a major pianist on the American and international scene.

A dedicated educator of young musicians, Mr. Feltsman holds the Distinguished Chair of Professor of Piano at the State University of New York, New Paltz, and is a member of the piano faculty at the Mannes College of Music in New York City. He is the founder and Artistic Director of the International Festival-Institute PianoSummer at New Paltz, a three-week-long, intensive training program for advanced piano students that attracts major young talents from all over the world.

Mr. Feltsman’s extensive discography has been released on the Melodiya, Sony Classical, Musical Heritage Society, and Nimbus labels. His discography includes eight albums of clavier works of J.S. Bach, recordings of Beethoven’s last five piano sonatas and of the Moonlight, Pathetique and Appasionata Sonatas, solo piano works of Schubert, Schumann, Chopin, Liszt, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, Mussorgsky, Messiaen and Silvestrov, as well as concerti by Bach, Brahms, Chopin, Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninoff, and Prokofiev. His most recent recording with orchestra is a release of Rachmaninoff’s Concerto No. 3 with the Russian National Symphony Orchestra conducted by Mikhail Pletnev from a November 1992 performance at the Bolshoi Hall of Moscow Conservatory, alongside a recording of Rachmaninoff’s Elegy and Six Preludes made in November 2010. He also released within the last two years highly acclaimed “Tribute” recordings on the Nimbus label featuring the music of Tchaikovsky and Scriabin as well as recordings of Chopin’s Ballades, Waltzes and Impromptus.

Mr. Feltsman is an American citizen. He and his wife Haewon live in upstate NY with four dogs.

Music Under Stalin: Immersion Experience

A PCE Immersion Experience:

March 7, 11, 19 & 25

Dmitri Shostakovich and Mieczyslaw Weinberg influenced one another over the course of a remarkable creative conversation. The sparse “late style” of both composers arose collaboratively, and so did their use of Jewish themes.


Tuesday, March 7, 2017
Weinberg, Shostakovich, and “Jewishness”
Chamber Music with Commentary


March 11, 2017 and 19, 2017
Film Screenings at the National Gallery of Art

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Saturday, March 25, 2017
Concert: The Shostakovich-Weinberg Connection

PCE’s tradition of immersion experiences continues with an exploration of the complex relationship between Dmitri Shostakovich and  Miecyslaw Weinberg (1919-1996). Interest in Weinberg is rapidly growing. The violinist Gidon Kremer, who is leading the charge (and who performs the Weinberg Violin Concerto with the National Symphony in January 2017), considers Weinberg as significant as Shostakovich.

Weinberg and Shostakovich continually influenced one another over the course of a remarkable creative conversation. In particular, the spare “late style” of both composers arose collaboratively, and so did their earlier use of Jewish themes.

Weinberg was Jewish – a Polish refugee whose parents and sister perished in the Holocaust. Though Stalin’s Soviet Union rescued him, Weinberg was himself arrested in 1953 as part of Stalin’s war against the Jews. Also, his father-in-law, the famous Jewish actor Solomon Mihkoels, was in 1948 the first victim of this internal war.

The distinguished Jewish-music scholar James Loeffler, who takes part in PCE’s festival, adds: “Weinberg, having lost his Polish identity, was twice a survivor – of the Holocaust and of Stalin’s Jewish purges. Survivor guilt is intrinsic to his creative identity. He made his god the anti-Fascist Red Army.”

Concert: The Shostakovich-Weinberg Connection

Saturday, March 25
Sidney Harman Hall,
Harman Center for the Arts at 7:30 pm

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Alexander Toradze, piano
Edward Gero, actor
Chris Gekker, trumpet

PostClassical Ensemble
conducted by Angel Gil-Ordóñez

“Alexander Toradze plays as a man possessed, as if umbilically attached to the instrument, which in his hands becomes as varied and expressive as a full orchestra…  The audience roared approval…”
—The Guardian (London)

Shostakovich: Piano Concerto No. 1
Theatrical interlude with Edward Gero as Shostakovich
Shostakovich/Barshai: String Symphony, Op. 110a
Mieczyslaw Weinberg: Symphony No. 10

6:30 Pre-concert presentation: Weinberg chamber music (with commentary)

PCE’s tradition of immersion experiences continues with an exploration of the complex relationship between Dmitri Shostakovich and  Miecyslaw Weinberg (1919-1996). Interest in Weinberg is rapidly growing. The violinist Gidon Kremer, who is leading the charge (and who performs the Weinberg Violin Concerto with the National Symphony in January 2017), considers Weinberg as significant as Shostakovich.

 Weinberg and Shostakovich continually influenced one another over the course of a remarkable creative conversation. In particular, the spare “late style” of both composers arose collaboratively, and so did their earlier use of Jewish themes.

 Weinberg was Jewish – a Polish refugee whose parents and sister perished in the Holocaust. Though Stalin’s Soviet Union rescued him, Weinberg was himself arrested in 1953 as part of Stalin’s war against the Jews. Also, his father-in-law, the famous Jewish actor Solomon Mihkoels, was in 1948 the first victim of this internal war.

 The distinguished Jewish-music scholar James Loeffler, who takes part in PCE’s festival, adds: “Weinberg, having lost his Polish identity, was twice a survivor – of the Holocaust and of Stalin’s Jewish purges. Survivor guilt is intrinsic to his creative identity. He made his god the anti-Fascist Red Army.”

Watch a video about Alexander Toradze, Paavo Järvi, and the making of their recording of the Shostakovich Piano Concerti:

READ MORE about events in the PCE Immersion Experience: Music Under Stalin

Weinberg, Shostakovich, and “Jewishness”


Weinberg, Shostakovich, and “Jewishness”
Chamber Music with Commentary

Tuesday, March 7 at 7:30 pm
The Edlavitch Jewish Community Center of Washington DC

Mieczyslaw Weinberg: Sonata No. 1 for Solo Cello
Shostakovich: Piano Trio No. 2 (1944)
Weinberg: Piano Trio (1945)

Netanel Draiblate, violin
Benjamin Capps, cello
Alexander Shtarkman, piano

With commentary by James Loeffler, Associate Professor of History and Jewish Studies at the University of Virginia.

 

READ MORE about events in the PCE Immersion Experience:
MUSIC UNDER STALIN

Music Under Stalin: Film Screenings at the National Gallery of Art

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 March 11, 2017 at 2:30 pm

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“The Cranes are Flying” (1956) – the famous Soviet film (a fascinating study in the creative application of Socialist Realism), with music by Mieczyslaw Weinberg.

Commentary by GWU film scholar Peter Rollberg

With Weinberg solo cello music performed by Benjamin Capps

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March 19, 2017 at 4:00 pm

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–“Shostakovich Viola Sonata” (1981) – a documentary film by Aleksandr Sokurov.

Commentary (and some performing) by Alexander Toradze

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 READ MORE about events in the PCE Immersion Experience:
M
USIC UNDER STALIN

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The Washington Ballet
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WWFM The Classical Network
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American University
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