Past Seasons

The Stravinsky Project

The Stravinsky Project

April 8 – 10, 2011
The  Music Center at Strathmore
National Gallery of Art
Washington, DC – Bethesda, MD

Rediscover the music that changed everything, shocking audiences of the early 20th century and continuing to shape the course of the art through the 1960s. In this program you will hear Stravinsky’s searing Les Noces, written for chorus, pianos and percussion and the Russian folk wedding songs that inspired the piece; his explosive Concerto for Piano and Winds and Symphonies for Wind Instruments, which inaugurated his neo-classical period.

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Sublime Confluence: The Music of Lou Harrison

Sublime Confluence:
The Music of Lou Harrison

February 26 – March 6, 2011
The George Washington University
National Gallery of Art
Embassy of Indonesia
Washington, DC

Lou Harrison (1917-2003) is a great California composer whose music is little heard in the Eastern United States. Drawing on the fragrant poetry of Indonesian gamelan music, he achieved a serene synthesis of Western and Eastern modes.

In collaboration with the Indonesian Embassy, the Film Division of the National Gallery of Art, The George Washington University, and Wesleyan University. This festival is made possible with support from the National Endowment for the Arts, and The Aaron Copland Fund for Music.

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Encounters: David Taylor

Encounters: David Taylor

Thursday, October 1, 2009
Harman Center for the Arts
Sidney Harman Hall
Washington, DC

PostClassical Ensemble showcases one of the world’s great instrumentalists: the bass trombonist David Taylor, whose flamboyant virtuosity and eruptive temperament astonishingly transfigure music of every stripe.

Taylor performs with PostClassical Ensemble a medley of harrowing late Schubert songs, plus a pair of jazzy and rambunctious Daniel Schnyder scores: subZERO Concerto for Bass Trombone and Orchestra (D.C. premiere) and RoTor (world premiere).

Post concert discussion with composer Daniel Schnyder.

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Interpreting Liszt

Interpreting Liszt

February 12 & 13, 2010
Georgetown University
Washington, DC

Georgetown University’s Department of Performing Arts and PostClassical Ensemble celebrate the pioneering, virtuosic pianist, composer, and teacher Franz Liszt (1811-1886) with a two-day festival, Interpreting Liszt, on February 12 and 13, 2010 at Georgetown University. Free daytime conference events and two ticketed evening concerts will explore issues in interpreting the piano and choral music of Franz Liszt and showcase new perspectives on the Romantic artistic personality. The full schedule incorporates film, art, literature, historic recordings, expert speakers, and performances by acclaimed artists performing repertoire ranging from the familiar —the B minor Sonata, the Dante Sonata, Totentanz— to such novelties as the Pastorale from Christus and a pair of religious choral works.

The two evening concerts include Liszt and Italy on Feb. 12 at 7:30 p.m. —incorporating readings and visual art and exploring Liszt’s relationship to masterpieces of literature, painting, and sculpture— and Angels and Demons on Feb. 13 at 7:30 p.m., conducted by PostClassical Ensemble Music Director Angel Gil-Ordóñez, exploring the duality of an artist by turns religious and macabre.

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The Gershwin Project

The Gershwin Project

September 21 – 24, 2010
Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center
University of Maryland
College Park, MD

No other American composer straddles as many musical worlds. In the realm of popular song and jazz, Gershwin’s genius has long been celebrated. In the world of classical music, he was long marginalized as a “pops” composer —but no longer. PostClassical Ensemble explores “interpreting Gershwin” —the man and the music.

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.

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Falla and Flamenco

Falla and Flamenco

April 17-23, 2010
Brooklyn Academy of Music
Brooklyn, NY

Harman Center for the Arts
Sidney Harman Hall
Washington, DC

Manuel de Falla, Spain’s most famous composer, used flamenco to revitalize Spanish music after a century of somnolence. El Corregidor y la Molinera (The Magistrate and the Miller’s Wife) is an early version of Falla’s beloved The Three-Cornered Hat and exemplifies the haunting cante jondo of flamenco song and the dramatic exuberance of flamenco dance. Choreographed by Spain’s renowned Ramón Oller, this new production —featuring dancers from Barcelona and New York— is part of the international celebration of Spain’s Spring 2010 Presidency of the European Union.

In conjunction with Falla and Flamenco, the National Gallery presents a free screening of rare films of legendary flamenco artists in private performance, with commentary by flamenco authority Brook Zern, on Sunday, April 18 at 4:30 p.m. Flamenco at the Source: Rito y Geografía del Cante Flamenco.

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Carnival of the Creatures

Carnival of the Creatures

Sunday, October 26, 2008
The Music Center at Strathmore
Bethesda, MD

Just in time for Halloween – a children’s concert with a “scary” second half. The first half is all Saint-Saens, including “The Swan” danced by an 11-year-old ballerina. And we’ll have children reciting Ogden Nash’s ingenious animal poems, and the voodoo chant that inspired the black magic of Sensemaya.

Camille Saint-Saens: The Carnival of the Animals
Henry Cowell: The Banshee, The Tiger
Maurice Ravel: Scarbo
A scary improvisation
Silvestre Revueltas: Sensemayá

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The Mexican Odyssey

The Mexican Odyssey

Thursday, November 6, 2008
The Harman Center for the Arts
Sydney Harman Hall
Washington, DC

Mexico’s explosive cultural saga — from stark Mayan ceremonies to the torrid revolutionary art of Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo — produced centuries of explosive music. This unique program, combining music, history, and visual art, includes the Aztec intensities captured by Carlos Chavez, the florid reverence of Mexican Baroque, and the shrill trumpets and booming tubas remembered by Silvestre Revueltas from his rural childhood.

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Copland & the Cold War

Copland & the Cold War

Saturday, January 31, 2009
Georgetown University
Davis Performing Arts Center - Gonda Theatre
Washington, DC

In 1953 Aaron Copland was subpoenaed by Senator Joseph McCarthy and asked about his dealings with Communists. How did the Red Scare impact on the artistic and national identity of America’s most famous concert composer? Our program traces his compositional odyssey: from student years to modernism, to 1930s populism and political radicalism, to a cerebral “late style.”

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Iberian Inspirations

Iberian Inspirations

Sunday, March 1, 2009
The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts
Fortas Chamber Music Concerts
Washington, DC

As the major presenter of Spanish concert music in both DC and New York City, PostClassical Ensemble has long made a cause of the lesser-known works of Falla, and of the master Catalonian modernists Montsalvatge and Gerhard. We return to the Kennedy Center with a program including the American premiere of a Montsalvatge sinfonietta inspired by the paintings of Salvador Dali.

With Harolyn Blackwell, soprano

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AHMSA
Chevron
Clarice
MCI
Marpat
Emerging America
Asociación de Empresarios Mexicanos
Conaculta
MCU
DCLFF
ACE
Georgetown2
Georgetown
Graham Holdings
DC Commission on The Arts & Humanities
peer
Dallas
Spain
national gallery
Duke
Andrew Mellon
Dumbarton
SRE
Austrian Cultural Forum
Artworks
morris