December 5, 2003, 7pm
Georgetown University – Gaston Hall
Washington, DC

At a moment in history when we urgently need models of multi-cultural cooperation, the PostClassical Ensemble presents an evening of music, visual art, dance, and the spoken word. Sephardic songs sung by Flory Jagoda, the ecstatic polyphony of Tomás Luis de Victoria, the mystic poetry of Juan de la Cruz and Teresa de Jesús, and the sinuous arabesques of the Arab ‘Ud celebrates Spain’s music of three faiths. Also on the program Manuel de Falla’s El Amor Brujo, with its ardent Moorish echoes and gypsy strains, and four Sephardic songs colorfully re-imagined by the contemporary Puerto Rican composer Roberto Sierra, revisit Andalusia’s magic confluence of cultures and religions.

In collaboration with Woodstock Theological Center, the Middle East Institute, and the Spanish Ministry of Culture

Flory Jagoda, Sephardic singer
Hicham Chani, qanun
Kim Sopata, recorder
Keri Aldema, mezzo-soprano
Sara Jerez, dancer
PostClassical Ensemble conducted by Angel Gil-Ordóñez

Program

I: The Christian World

Choral music by Tomas Lois de Victoria
Poetry by John of the Cross, Theresa of Avila, and Ignatius Loyola

II: The Jewish World

Sephardic Songs (Flory Jagoda)
Roberto Sierra: Four Sephardic Songs (PostClassical Ensemble)
Readings from Isaac Luria and the Zohar

III: The Arab World

Music performed by Hicham Chami and Kim Sopata
Readings from Ibn Al’Arabi’s The Bezels of Wisdom

IV: Confluence

Manuel de Falla: El Amor Brujo, excerpts from the original version (1915)
(PostClassical Ensemble with Keri Aldema and Sara Jerez)

Review: The Washington Post Download the Program Brochure