Dvořák and America

HARRY T. BURLEIGH MEETS ANTONIN DVORAK

A co-presentation of the Duke Ellington School of the Arts, Georgetown University, and PostClassical Ensemble.

Friday, April 19, 2013, at 7:30 pm
Duke Ellington School of the Arts
3500 R St. NW
Washington, DC
Tickets: $15

Purchase Tickets

Free admission for students from Georgetown University and Duke Ellington School with school ID, but reservations are recommended.

Duke Ellington School of the Arts Chorus
Conducted by Steven Allen.

The combined orchestras of Duke Ellington School of the Arts Orchestra and Georgetown University.
Conducted by Angel Gil-Ordóñez

PART ONE:
Harry T. Burleigh and Plantation Song – a choral concert with commentary and a visual presentation

PART TWO:
Dvorak’s New World Symphony – a symphonic concert with commentary and a visual presentationThis unique program explores Dvorak’s prophecy that American music would ultimately be founded upon “Negro melodies.” Dvorak’s African-American assistant Harry T. Burleigh pioneered in bringing spirituals into the concert hall. Dvorak’s New World Symphony pioneered in infusing concert music with the riches of African-American and Native American culture.

The visual presentation applied to the Largo and Scherzo of the New World Symphony (co-created by PCE Artistic Director Joe Horowitz) culls pertinent text from Longfellow’s The Song of Hiawatha (which Dvorak acknowledged as an inspiration), as well as iconic American paintings by Frederic Church, Albert Biestadt, Frederick Remington, and George Catlin.

Dvořák Festival

Dvořák’s American sojourn (1892–95) is one of the most amazing chapters in the history of classical music in the United States. During this brief period he composed his best-known symphony, string quartet and concerto. And he uttered his most famous, influential and controversial words, that a “great and noble school” of American music would be founded upon “Negro melodies.”Our festival, with three concerts in four days at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center (College Park), plus an earlier event at Georgetown University, includes the world premiere of a 35-minute “Hiawatha Melodrama”—which we record for Naxos the next day.

“Dvořák and America”

Friday, March 1, 2013 at 8:00 pm
Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center: Dekelboum Hall
University of Maryland
College Park, MD
Tickets: $35 ($10 students).

Purchase Tickets Box office 301-405-ARTS.
Single tickets go on sale Aug. 6.

Kevin Deas, bass-baritone
Benjamin Pasternack, piano
PostClassical Ensemble conducted by Angel Gil-Ordóñez

Program
Dvořák: Serenade for Strings
Dvořák: American Suite (version for orchestra with visual presentation)
Dvořák/Horowitz/Beckerman: Hiawatha Melodrama for narrator and orchestra (world premiere)

Pre-concert presentation at 7:00 pm / Gildenhorn Recital Hall
Dvořák’s American Suite performed by Benjamin Pasternack, piano. Commentary by Joseph Horowitz and Michael Beckerman

NOTE: If you want to hear Dvorak at Clarice Smith — use the metro, green line, College Park stop. And get picked up right from the metro: Nite Ride operates seven nights a week from 5:30PM – 7:30AM, providing a free curb-to-curb service, which can drive you to and from the Metro station and the Clarice Smith Center. For service please call 301.314.NITE (6483).

Dvořák and Harry Burleigh

Friday February 22, 2013 at 1:15 p.m.
The Georgetown University Music Program’s Friday Music Series
Georgetown University, McNeir Hall

Free admission.

Harry Burleigh, Antonin Dvorak’s assistant at the National Conservatory in New York City (1892-95), became the first composer to transcribe spirituals as art songs, and the first person to sing them. His spiritual arrangements, later used by such artists as Paul Robeson and Marian Anderson, remain in the active repertoire to this day.

Kevin Deas, bass-baritone
Lura Johnson, piano

Dvorak: Humoresques in F and G-flat major
Dvorak: American Suite: Andante
Dvorak/Fisher: “Goin’ Home”
Burleigh (arr.): Selected Spirituals

 

Joseph Horowitz’s “Artists in Exile”: Dvořák and America

Saturday, February 23, 2013–5:00 pm
Minás Gallery
815 W. 36th Street
Baltimore, MD 21211
FREE

Join award-winning cultural historian Joseph Horowitz as he reads from and discusses his book Artists in Exile (Harper Collins, 2008).  In his book, Horowitz explores Czech composer Antonin Dvorak’s “American accent.” Dvorak drew inspiration from African American spirituals, Native American chants and the American prairie while in New York in the 1890s. Find out how Dvorak poured those influences into the New World Symphony and other compositions, accompanied  by plenty of musical examples. Horowitz will compare Dvorak to other famous visitors and immigrants, including Erich Korngold — who would become Hollywood’s go-to film composer. This event is part of the PostClassical Ensemble’s “Dvorak and America” festival in D.C., which includes several free concerts from Feb. 22 – March 1. For more info, please go here or contact your host, Samantha Buker at sam.buker@gmail.com. Books will be on hand at the event.

“American Roots”

Tuesday, February 26, 2013 at 8:00 pm
Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center: Gildenhorn Recital Hall
University of Maryland
College Park, MD
Free admission

For More Information

Benjamin Pasternack, piano
Commentary by Joseph Horowitz and Angel Gil-Ordóñez.

Program
Dvorak: Two Humoresques; American Suite (excerpts)
Arthur Farwell: Navajo War Dance No. 2 and Pawnee Horses (DC area premieres)
Ferruccio Busoni: Indian Notebook No. 2
Bernstein/Pasternack: Three Dances from “On the Town”

 

“Dvorak in Search of America”

Wednesday, February 27, 2013 at 8:00 pm
Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center
University of Maryland
College Park, MD
Free admission

For More Information

“Dvorak in Search of America”
— a University of Maryland faculty concert with readings and commentary

Produced by David Salness in association with PostClassical Ensemble.
Commentary by Joseph Horowitz, Patrick Warfield, and the performers.

Dvorak: Humoresque in G-flat Major, Op. 101
Sally McLain, violin
Rita Sloan, piano

Dvorak: Sonatina for Violin and Piano, Op. 100
David Salness, violin
Rita Sloan, piano

Dvorak: Biblical Songs and Gypsy Songs (selections)
Hall Johnson (arr.): “City Called Heaven”
John Carter: Prelude and Rondo (“Peter Go Ring Dem Bells”)
Carmen Balthrop, mezzo-soprano

Jose Caceres, piano

Dvorak: “American” String Quartet in F Major, Op. 96
The Left Bank String Quartet

NOTE: If you want to hear Dvorak at Clarice Smith — use the metro, green line, College Park stop. And get picked up right from the metro: Nite Ride operates seven nights a week from 5:30PM – 7:30AM, providing a free curb-to-curb service, which can drive you to and from the Metro station and the Clarice Smith Center. For service please call 301.314.NITE (6483).

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